The Global Startup Ecosystem report 2019, published in May 2019 by Startup Genome - a worldwide reference for start-up ecosystems, offers a global overview on the development of start-up ecosystems and insights on new developments in terms of sectors and geographic dynamics.

Here are some of the key findings of the report:

  • There is no ‘next’ Silicon Valley — instead, there are 30 start-up ecosystems around the world that will soon lay claim to a parallel vibrancy and economic productivity.

Among those 30 ecosystems, 7 are to be found in EU27 countries: Paris, Berlin, Stockholm, Amsterdam, Barcelona, Dublin and Munich. London is also part of it.

  • Deep Tech start-ups — those relying heavily on intellectual property — are the fastest-growing group globally. The four fastest-growing Startup Sub-Sectors are Advanced Manufacturing & Robotics, Blockchain, Agritech & New Food, and Artificial Intelligence.

The report also provides the first results of an ongoing global policy audit on policy actions supporting start-ups showing that:

  • Efforts to expand funding for startups and
  • startup support organisations and programs (SSOP)

are the most common policy actions worldwide, whereas bankruptcy reform or procurement-based policies are the least common.

The global policy audit chapter finally presents first attempts to compare policy action to ecosystem performance. A major limitation consists hereby in the lack of substantial data. The authors expect to proceed with their audit and provide more specific results in the upcoming Global Startup Ecosystem report 2020.

Source: Global Startup Ecosystem report 2019

Actually, some Interreg Europe projects (e.g. iEER, Innova Foster) have identified this data gap and are working currently on it on from the perspective of entrepreneurial ecosystems (as opposed to isolated policies).

More detailed information on their results will be published in our upcoming policy brief on business support ecosystems: stay tuned!